Category Archives: Uncategorized

Essential Eelgrass: Ecology of a Vital Resource in Maine’s Coastal Waters

The Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory (MDIBL) invites you to a 1-hr webinar to learn from scientist Dr. Hilary Neckles (United States Geological Survey) about the ecology of eelgrass: its range, its services, its threats, and efforts to preserve it in the state of Maine. She will make a presentation using a concept map that will be made available as a research, curriculum development, and teaching tool. There will be plenty of time for questions and answers following Dr. Neckle’s presentation.

Date: Mar 8, 2012; 3:30 pm ET
Location: Online Webinar
Attendance: Science Teachers and Others Interested in Marine Environments

Click here to register for the webinar.

Learn more about MDIBL’s environmental education programs.

Essential Eelgrass: Ecology of a Vital Resource in Maine’s Coastal Waters

The Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory (MDIBL) invites you to a 1-hr webinar to learn from scientist Dr. Hilary Neckles (United States Geological Survey) about the ecology of eelgrass: its range, its services, its threats, and efforts to preserve it in the state of Maine. She will make a presentation using a concept map that will be made available as a research, curriculum development, and teaching tool. There will be plenty of time for questions and answers following Dr. Neckle’s presentation.

Date: Mar 8, 2012; 3:30 pm ET
Location: Online Webinar
Attendance: Science Teachers and Others Interested in Marine Environments

Click here to register for the webinar.

Learn more about MDIBL’s environmental education programs.

Blog Updates Scientists’ Image

This Is What A Scientist Looks Like, a blog developed by science writer and multimedia specialist, Allie Wilkinson, invites scientists to send a photo of themselves and a description of their work to be displayed on the blog. Wilkinson hopes to help change the perception that all scientists look a certain way, and do the same work. The project was featured in a Scientific American article, What a Scientist Looks Like. In the article, author Mariette DiChristina states, “Children as young as kindergartners, when asked to draw a scientist, are likely to make a picture of a white man in a white lab coat—and they don’t see themselves that way.” Photos posted on This is What a Scientist Looks Like include men and women of all races and ethnicities – in the field holding hawks, on stage singing in a rock band, hugging trees, sitting at desks, and riding motorcycles.

“There is no cookie-cutter mold of what a scientist looks like. A scientist can look like you, or can look like me.” -Allie Wilkinson

Visit the project page to learn more, or submit a photo!

Blog Updates Scientists’ Image

This Is What A Scientist Looks Like, a blog developed by science writer and multimedia specialist, Allie Wilkinson, invites scientists to send a photo of themselves and a description of their work to be displayed on the blog. Wilkinson hopes to help change the perception that all scientists look a certain way, and do the same work. The project was featured in a Scientific American article, What a Scientist Looks Like. In the article, author Mariette DiChristina states, “Children as young as kindergartners, when asked to draw a scientist, are likely to make a picture of a white man in a white lab coat—and they don’t see themselves that way.” Photos posted on This is What a Scientist Looks Like include men and women of all races and ethnicities – in the field holding hawks, on stage singing in a rock band, hugging trees, sitting at desks, and riding motorcycles.

“There is no cookie-cutter mold of what a scientist looks like. A scientist can look like you, or can look like me.” -Allie Wilkinson

Visit the project page to learn more, or submit a photo!

Teen Ocean Summit Recap

October 1-2, 47 teens gathered in Boston at the New England Aquarium to participate in NEOSEC’s Teen Ocean Summit 2011. All were revisiting the data they collected over the summer as part of the NaGISA protocol with one of our 9 Summer Science partner camps. On Saturday the teens worked in pre-assigned, mixed study groups to develop research questions, working with partner scientists who guided them through the type of thinking they use in their own research. The teens’ questions focused on the distribution of various species among the Summer Science sampling sites pictured here.

Some of the questions the study groups developed include: Does water temperature affect the abundance of Littorina littorea? Does latitude affect the density of focus vesiculosus? Does the coverage of Ascophyllum nodosum affect the abundance of Littorina littorea? Investigating these questions, they used ArcMap geographic information systems (GIS) software, and drew on the expertise of the Aquarium’s GIS specialists to map species occurrence and physical oceanographic data. With dinner at Hard Rock Café; sleeping with the jellies, sharks, and rays in the Aquarium; and a morning scavenger hunt around the Giant Ocean Tank, the teens had plenty of right-brain activities to provide fun breaks from hard work. On Sunday, the research groups presented their findings in a public poster presentation session.

    “…it means so much to me to be able to be part of anything Ocean related!!! That was honestly the most fun time I’ve had in a while!” — Leah, 16, NEAq Harbor Discoveries
    “Just wanted to let you know how much fun I had at the ocean summit this weekend. I had a fun time getting to know other teens and sharing data with them. Thanks for giving me the opportunity to attend the teen summit.” — Hannah, 12, Northeastern University Coastal Ocean Science Academy

Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council Members Needed

NOAA’s Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary is seeking to fill three seats on its advisory council, which represents the public’s interests in sanctuary matters and provides advice to the sanctuary superintendent.  The sanctuary is now accepting applications for one primary member seat representing Research.  Applications also are being sought for two alternate member seats representing Conservation.

Candidates are selected based on their expertise and experience in relation to the seat for which they are applying, community and professional affiliations, and knowledge regarding the protection and management of marine resources. Applicants who are chosen should expect to serve three-year terms.  Alternates attend meetings when primary members are not available and assume a seat if a primary member resigns.

Applications are due April 21, 2011. To receive an application kit, or for further information please contact Elizabeth Stokes via e-mail at Elizabeth.Stokes@noaa.gov; by phone at 781-545-8026 X 201; or by mail at 175 Edward Foster Road, Scituate, MA 02066. Application kits can also be downloaded from the sanctuary’s website at http://stellwagen.noaa.gov/.

Job Opening: LiMPETS Program Coordinator, California

The Pacific Grove Museum of Natural History is seeking a Program Coordinator to launch a six-month pilot of the Long-term Monitoring Program and Experiential Training for Students (LiMPETS.) Upon completion of the pilot, the program will be evaluated for continued operations as either a part-time or full-time position. Depending on that evaluation, the ideal candidate would be able to commit to employment for multiple years. Position compensation is commiserate with experience, with a part-time salary range of $25,000 – $35,000.

LiMPETS is a monitoring program that involves teacher, students, and local communities, as citizen scientists in a network of long-term data collection of the sand beach and rocky intertidal communities to establish a baseline. These citizen scientists gain knowledge about observing nature and doing science, as well as an appreciation about how data that can document changes and be used to protect our local marine ecosystems are gathered. Through this monitoring, these citizen scientists are establishing a web-linked baseline from which we can better address current and future impacts. The program, Long-term Monitoring Program and Experiential Training for Students, or simply the LiMPETS network, connect teachers, students, and the community to the ocean, involves them directly in a real scientific endeavor, and increases their awareness of, and interest in, the marine environment and scientific processes. The vision of the LiMPETS network is to be recognized and respected as one of the nation’s premier student-based citizen science programs.

The LiMPETS network provides authentic, hands-on coastal monitoring experiences that empower teachers, students, and the community to conduct real science and become ocean stewards. Teachers participate in professional development to gain the necessary skills and confidence to engage their students in meaningful monitoring activities in the field. Approximately 3,500 teachers and students along the coast of California are already collecting data from rocky intertidal and sandy beach habitats as part of the LiMPETS network in our national marine sanctuaries. www.Limpetsmonitoring.org

Interested candidates should email or mail their resumes to:

Lori Mannel, Executive Director, Pacific Grove Museum of Natural History

165 Forest Avenue

Pacific Grove, CA 93950

mannel@pgmuseum.org