Ocean Explorium at New Bedford Seaport

Website: http://oceanexplorium.org/
Address: 174 Union Street, New Bedford, MA 02740
Contact: Abbey Spargo
Emailaspargo@oceanexplorium.org
Phone: 508-994-5400 x23

Mission: It is the mission of the Ocean Explorium to establish New Bedford as a center for ocean science public education, with an emphasis on environmental stewardship and science literacy.

Ocean Literacy:

Principle 1: The Earth has one big ocean with many features
We use our Science on a Sphere to address OLP 1, we conduct presentations related to the Indian Ocean Tsunami and other impacts on the ocean and discuss how they affect us on both a global and local scale. We also address this principle in our field trips, educational programming, ocean voice speaker series and our teacher content institutes.

Principle 2: The ocean and life in the ocean shape the features of the Earth
We use our Science on a Sphere to address OLP 2, we conduct presentations related to the Bathymetry and discuss geological features of the earth that shape our planet. We also discuss biomes and use examples of Vent communities to discuss how the ocean shapes life. We also address this principle in our field trips, educational programming, ocean voice speaker series and our teacher content institutes.

Principle 3: The ocean is a major influence on weather and climate
We use our Science on a Sphere to address OLP 3, we conduct presentations that use currents and sea surface temperature to explain the impact of the ocean on both weather and climate. We also discuss the impact of the ocean with climate change. We use the differences between weather and climate to discuss how they affect us on a local and global scale. We also address this principle in our field trips, educational programming, ocean voice speaker series and our teacher content institutes.

Principle 4: The ocean makes Earth habitable
We use our Science on a Sphere to address OLP 4 in conjunction with OLP 2 and 3. Our presentations have a multidisciplinary approach that we cover many of these principles at one time. We make sure to discuss things both locally and globally to provide our audience with perspective. We also address this principle in our field trips, educational programming, ocean voice speaker series and our teacher content institutes.

Principle 5: The ocean supports a diversity of life and ecosystems.
We use our Science on a Sphere and living exhibits to discuss OLP 5. We are able to discuss complex topics like climate change and affects on corals and then show them a living coral reef. Our presentations have a multidisciplinary approach that we cover many of these principles at one time using our living and non-living exhibits. We make sure to discuss things both locally and globally to provide our audience with perspective. We also address this principle in our field trips, educational programming, ocean voice speaker series and our teacher content institutes.

Principle 6: The ocean is connected to us and we are connected to it.
We use our Science on a Sphere and living exhibits to discuss OLP 6. We are able to discuss complex topics and make them approachable for our audience. Our presentations have a multidisciplinary approach that we cover many of these principles at one time using our living and non-living exhibits. We make sure to discuss things both locally and globally to provide our audience with perspective. We also address this principle in our field trips, educational programming, ocean voice speaker series and our teacher content institutes.

Principle 7: The ocean is largely unexplored.
We use our Science on a Sphere and living exhibits to discuss OLP 7. We also have exhibits on display that describe the work of the HabCam amongst others where our audience is able to view a “largely unexplored” part of the ocean. We also address this principle in our field trips, educational programming, ocean voice speaker series and our teacher content institutes.

Ocean Observing:

As we have a Science on a Sphere, a lot of the data set and visual information has been collected by ocean observing data (remote sensing techniques). We frequently refer to how the data was collected and how buoys etc are used to help scientists ground-truth measurements they are getting from space.