2018 Summit Speakers

We have a great lineup of speakers from across New England and beyond to help us all learn more about how the ocean and life in the ocean shapes the features of Earth.


Keynote Address:

“A Perfect Storm: The Collision of Hurricanes, Climate Change, and Coastal Population Growth”

Hear from our keynote speaker, Jeff Donnelly, Senior Scientist and Director of the Seafloor Samples Laboratory at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. The overarching goal of his research program is to understand how climate variability changes tropical cyclone activity, alters sea levels, and affects water availability. In addition, he seeks to understand the impact of changing climate on terrestrial and coastal landforms and ecosystems.

Panel:

“Let Sea Level Rise Surge into your Curriculum: Understanding the Facts and Connecting Concepts to NGSS Standards”

Panel Moderator – Ari Daniel, multimedia storyteller, NOVA, public radio

Panelists –

Joe DelliCarpini , Acting Meteorologist-In-Charge/Science and Operations Officer, National Weather Service Boston/Norton, MA

Julia Knisel, StormSmart Coasts Manager, MA Office of Coastal Zone Management

Meredyth Sullivan, LabVenture! Program Manager, Gulf of Maine Research Institute

Concurrent Sessions:

Session 1:

Sea Level Rise: Science and Interpretation
Greg Berman The use of signs and markers in educating the public on SLR
Catie Fyfe Sea level rise interpretation
Sea Level Rise: Past to Future
Dick Bailey Sea level change in the near future: Lessons from Neogene sedimentary sequences
Kathryn Buckley Mapping sea level rise in Boston: Understanding the past to plan for the future
Ocean and Coastal Acidification: How it Affects the Ocean and You
Bob Chen
Shannon Davis
Joe Salisbury
Lightning Talks
Bill Andrake A story in the sand
Megan Strand
Molly Jacobs Bluff Point: A case study for coastal geology
Dave Grant Quantifying coastal change using student-initiated citizen science (Ocean Literacy principles 2 – 4)

Session 2:

Coastal Dynamics
George Elvin On the edge: Architecture and the new coastal dynamics
Maria Lyons Sea level rise and resiliency: History and future of Port Norfolk, Dorchester
Ocean Literacy Principle 2 & NGSS Standards
Diana Payne OL and NGSS: Putting the pieces together
Valerie Cournoyer
Learning from the Rock Record
Robyn Hannigan How we know what we know: Reading the rock record to understand past climate and predict the future of our ocean
Tracy Rogers
Lightning Talks
Shannon Donovan Connecting to Fundamental Concepts of OL#2 with the Ocean Exploration Trust’s Corp of Exploration
Heather Starkel
Avalon Bunge
Pat Harcourt Four approaches to teaching about sea level rise

Session 3:

Sea Level Rise: Wetlands
Meagan Eagle Gonneea The vital response of coastal wetlands to sea level rise
Joan Muller NOAA/NERRS educational resources related to sea level rise
Coastal Erosion
Josh Helms Battling erosion in coastal communities
William Hurley Wave tank design and build for studying wave dynamics and coastline erosion
Sea Life becomes Landforms
Carolina Bastidas Nastiness in my clean sandy beach
Paul McGuinness High school and higher ed collaborations in Marine Sciences
Seaweed Art and Science
Mary Jameson Chatowsky
Jarrett Byrnes

Concurrent Session Descriptions:

Greg Berman – The use of signs and markers in educating the public on SLR
Sea level rise is still misunderstood by many who live at and visit the coastline. Relatively simple signage has been used to help interpret sea level rise to the public. This presentation explain the science behind the signs.

Catie Fyfe – Sea level rise interpretation
In spring 2018 Long Pasture Mass Audubon Wildlife Sanctuary installed a series of simple trail markers to indicate predicted Sea Level rise. As a community nature center, Long Pasture’s simple signage provides interpretative opportunities for the public and schools to visualize sea level rise in their own backyards.


Dick Bailey – Sea level change in the near future: Lessons from Neogene sedimentary sequences
Sea level change along the Atlantic coast during the Neogene Period has been dramatic. During the late Pliocene, sea level stood about 25 m higher than modern levels. Anticipated near term future rise in sea level will be significant and may occur as fast or faster than episodes of ancient sea level rise. It is important to consider rates of geological processes such as sea level change on both a geologic and a human time scale.

Kathryn Buckley – Mapping sea level rise in Boston: Understanding the past to plan for the future
This presentation reviews a series of lessons in which students used map resources to understand and plan for sea level rise in the City of Boston. They compared historical maps to the interactive maps created by Climate Ready Boston to understand the impact of rising seas. Students reviewed work completed by real urban planners and designed original solutions before presenting their work to the class.

Bob Chen, Joe Salisbury, and Shannon Davis – Ocean and coastal acidification: How it Affects the ocean and you
Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations leads to ocean acidification (OA) that affects the dissolution of rocks, the health of organisms, and the functioning of ecosystems. This session will explore the science and impacts of OA and novel ways to communicate and demonstrate several difficult, key concepts needed to understand OA at all levels. 


Bill Andrake – A story in the sand
My eighth grade team and I take our students to Crane Beach in Ipswich, MA to engage in a hands-on, field study. I will share how my students piece together a story as to the geographic origin of Crane Beach. By determining the mineral composition of this sand, students are able to see connections to the physical geography of our region Students have an opportunity to apply scientific principles and experience geology in a very real way.

Molly Jacobs – Bluff Point: A case study for coastal geology
Project Oceanology has been teaching students about coastal geology at Bluff Point in Groton, CT for more than forty years. Bluff Point is a superb place to see glacial erratics and moraines and to discuss the glacial history of Long Island Sound. On a shorter timescale, there is a long sandbar that is used to discuss more immediate impacts of ocean processes. We will discuss the development of a new, NGSS-aligned unit focused on the coastal geology of Bluff Point.

Dave Grant – Quantifying coastal change using student-initiated citizen science (Ocean Literacy principles 2 – 4)
A demonstration of student-initiated analysis of the Sandy Hook Spit (NJ) in NY Harbor – its growth and changes since Henry Hudson first charted it in 1609. Discuss students’ perspectives (Grades 5-12) on interpreting field observations, geographic maps and navigational charts, and soils and botanical evidence of the spit, to document rates of coastal change on barrier beaches.


George Elvin – On the edge: Architecture and the new coastal dynamics
Few aspects of the built landscape are changing as rapidly as our coastal environments. In response, architects, residents and regulators are reevaluating the design of our coastal buildings. Resilient inhabitation of our coastal regions will require more than just the new design strategies which resilient design offers; it demands new tools for thinking about architecture at the edge of the continent.

Maria Lyons – Sea level rise and resiliency: History and future of Port Norfolk, Dorchester
Port Norfolk, Dorchester has already witnessed the effect of sea level rise in Boston Harbor. This past winter storms and astronomical high tides have caused flooding and damage to the area. The new DCR Joseph Finnegan Park at Port Norfolk provided protection from the rising waters as it was designed to do. What will happen to this neighborhood as the sea continues to rise?


Diana Payne – OL and NGSS: Putting the pieces together
Can’t quite figure out how the Ocean Literacy (OL) Principles and NGSS fit together? This session will focus on the alignment of OL Principle #2 with NGSS, and the direct application of OL #2 and NGSS for educators. After an overview of the alignment, we’ll explore what happens when waves hit the shore and the coevolution of Earth’s systems and life on Earth.


Robyn Hannigan – How we know what we know: Reading the rock record to understand past climate and predict the future of our ocean
Changes in Earth’s climate are linked to mass extinction events. We reconstruct the past from the rock record and how we use this information to predict the future. In the Late Permian oceans, the ocean sulfur and carbon cycles decoupled. In the lab we learned how certain marine organisms respond to these conditions. Their responses tell us why some animals may have suffered more than others during the end-Permian crisis and what this means for our oceans today.


Shannon Donovan – Connecting to Fundamental Concepts of OL#2 with the Ocean Exploration Trust’s Corp of Exploration
The international Nautilus Corps of Exploration consists of scientists, engineers, communicators, educators and students. Our primary objective is to explore the ocean seeking out new discoveries in the fields of geology, biology, maritime history, archaeology, and chemistry while pushing the boundaries of engineering, technology, education and communications. This presentation will focus on aspects of our exploration season with strong connections to Fundamental Concepts of OL #2.

Pat Harcourt – Four approaches to teaching about sea level rise
We will try out four approaches to teaching about how sea level rise affects coastal areas: models, measurements, observations, and maps. The lessons are suitable for classroom teachers and informal educators. We will use data from NOAA, CZM, and USGS. Lessons will be posted and available online.


Meagan Eagle Gonneea – The vital response of coastal wetlands to sea level rise
Salt marshes build elevation to keep pace with sea level rise until the rate of sea level rise reaches a critical point. This threshold varies between marshes and is related to the amount of sediment reaching the marsh as well as the yearly growth of salt marsh plants. Coastal infrastructure alters the daily tidal flow which impacts the entire ecosystem’s capacity for dynamic response to sea level rise. Accelerating sea level rise will shape the future extent of coastal wetlands and the critical ecosystem services they provide.

Joan Muller – NOAA/NERRS educational resources related to sea level rise
This presentation will share curricula that were developed based on sea level rise research that was conducted at the Reserve including the Bringing Wetlands to Market STEM curriculum as well as additional resources on the topic of sea level rise.


Josh Helms – Battling erosion in coastal communities
The presentation will discuss the issues that arise as a result of anthropogenic changes to natural coastal systems for development and recreational activities along the coast. The presentation will also discuss ways to manage these areas into the future.

William Hurley – Wave tank design and build for studying wave dynamics and coastline erosion
Understanding how waves form, how they change due the sea floor shape, and how they impact and shape the coast is an important aspect of marine science. Many students at the high school level often don’t have the resources to study waves first hand. We present a relatively inexpensive means of constructing a fully functioning, portable wave tank. The wave tank was designed, built, and is run by students and Melrose High School. We also report some findings of student designed experiments with the wave tank with respect to coast erosion with different substrates.


Carolina Bastidas – Nastiness in my clean sandy beach
This presentation discusses processes of biological accretion and erosion at sea focused on carbonates. Examples include individual skeleton formation in various species to cementing communities such as coral and oyster reefs. How do fish poop, dead bodies, and other “nastiness” end on sandy beaches?

Paul McGuinness – High school and higher ed collaborations in Marine Sciences
Engaging community partners from Higher Ed institutions has been a successful way to enrich high school student experiences in the Marine Sciences and is an effective way to encourage students from an urban public high school to consider the Marine Sciences as career options.

Mary Jameson Chatowsky and Jarrett Byrnes – Seaweed art and science
Marine macroalgae, aka seaweed, shapes various coastlines by dominating ecosystems such as kelp forests and coral reefs (much of a coral reef is made of corraline red algae). People eat products made of seaweed, make money growing it in farms, and are fascinated by the myriad patterns and colors of it. This presentation will discuss the importance of seaweed to ocean ecosystems and society, explore the many ways people engage with the ocean through their interactions with seaweed, and demonstrate how to make art directly from a variety of common species found on your beach.