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Spotlight on NEOSEC Ocean Literacy Summit Planners – Corrine Steever and the New England Aquarium

Corrine Steever is a NEOSEC representative from the New England Aquarium and is serving on this year’s Ocean Literacy Summit Planning Committee. Corrine describes her NEOSEC role, “Because of the New England Aquarium’s role as the NEOSEC host institution, we always take a role in Summit planning. I am excited to be more involved with NEOSEC. I am energized by other NEOSEC members at our meetings. They made me want to be part of having a great Summit in Boston. Bringing together science and education is my world. We showcase teachers as scientists.”

Corrine is the Teacher Services Supervisor at the New England Aquarium Teacher Resource Center (TRC.) TRC supports teachers for grades pre-K to 12 as well as out-of-school instructors and informal educators. TRC offers a meeting place, free consultation appointments, research assistance, and access to a large collection of loan materials. TRC provides theme-based kits on a variety of topics to make ocean education engaging, inspiring, and informative. Most visitors are from New England, but they also come from around the world. 

Growing up in Minnesota, Corrine did not originally dream of being a marine science educator. “Originally I was interested in the arts. But in my third year of college, I decided to major in biology with a minor in psychology. I was interested in animal behavior. I thought I would be a field researcher. Then I got a phone call from the Student Conservation Association and AmeriCorps. My friend had recommended me for a job in western Massachusetts teaching in a K-6 school along with doing trail work in the summer. Two things were new to me: teaching and eating vegetarian!”

Corrine discovered a love for education and wanted to balance that with her love for animals. “Next I took on an outdoor education role in Georgia. I also took care of their small animal collection, including a herp lab.” That gave her the hands-on animal experience for her next job at Zoo New England. She then moved into professional development programs at the zoo. “I helped educators enhance their lessons with an inquiry style of teaching. I felt impactful doing the professional development work. The ripple effect was much bigger than a single hour in a classroom.” Corrine was doing less direct animal care which had been her strong interest. She moved to the Denver Zoological Foundation where animal husbandry was a big part of her role, although she still worked in the education department alongside education staff. “I missed teaching and providing professional development. I was looking to get back to that when someone forwarded me the New England Aquarium position. I’m learning a lot on the job. I show teachers that it’s okay to not know everything. It’s more the style of teaching, not knowing every fact. Teachers can build context with students.”  

Corrine addresses the occasional negative connotations some people may have about zoos and aquariums. “People may think ‘They’re caging animals. They’re out of their natural environment.’ There’s so much more to it. We help engage a connection with visitors. The animals act as ambassadors so that people want to protect, appreciate, and understand diverse life. The staff have a dedication to the work.” 

 

Corrine is concerned that people are not having constructive communication. “It’s hard right now. There’s a divide that’s growing more. People share strong opinions on social media but don’t have a conversation. I think most of us aren’t at extreme ends. We can have productive dialogues. We need to understand why people feel the way they do. We need to work to help people understand the science of climate change. We need to address basic human needs: food, water, shelter, safe spaces.”  

Corrine is proud of her adventurous spirit. “I’ve had a lot of different experiences. My past has given me a lot of confidence. I left Minnesota and just went for it. I became willing to move, be adventurous, and have curiosity. It was okay to not know people. Instead, I thought ‘Who am I going to meet? Who will give me insight into the world?’”

Thank you Corrine for bringing your can-do spirit to the New England Aquarium and NEOSEC!

Looking to share a ride to Portland, ME? Post here to find a ride / offer a ride

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Attending the Ocean Literacy Summit?  

Use this post to find a carpool buddy!

This year’s Summit is in Portland, ME. Whether you are coming from further North or from the South, correspond with other attendees by commenting on this post.

To comment, click on the headline above and a comment box will open below the post. See you at the Summit!

 

NNOCCI Spring 2016 study circles now accepting applications

 

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A Professional Development Opportunity: Application now open for Study Circles Spring 2016

For informal educators with an interest in climate change focused on ocean or coastal issues, a fully funded program for strategic climate change communication.

Visit www.neaq.org/NNOCCI  or www.nnocci.org for more information and to apply.  The application deadline is Sept. 28, 2015.

Please encourage colleagues to apply and share with your own networks.

Biomimicry Workshop for Informal Educators

 

Workshop for Informal Educators:
Biomimicry
New England Aquarium
February 27, 2015                        9am – 3:30pm

 
Join with other informal education professionals to explore Biomimicry – the process of emulating nature’s strategies. For 3.8 billion years plants, animals and microbes have been evolving and solving complex problems. Using an approach to innovation that seeks inspiration from nature, Biomimicry often looks to the ocean and marine animals. You are invited to join in exploring this fascinating topic and its potential in engaging a range of audiences through informal education.  This workshop will be an opportunity to learn from experts and practitioners on how Biomimicry can address some of the top environmental issues and how as informal educators we can inspire a new group of innovators to look towards nature to create sustainable solutions. 
 
This workshop, designed for and by informal educators, will include:
·        Keynote address by Sam Stier, Founding Director, Learning with Nature and former Director of Youth Education at Biomimicry 3.8. Sam will provide an introduction to biomimicry with an emphasis on the marine world followed by some examples of how it has been included in informal education for children.
·        Q&A with Sam Stier and group reflections on how Biomimicry can be used as a platform for informal education.
·        Planning and discussion groups based on topic areas the group identifies that will allow each educator to leave with one or more concrete ideas or activities to advance their work.
 
Offered by the New England Aquarium and Biomimicry New England
 

Cost:  FREE                                                              
Registration is required and space is limited
Register by Wednesday, February 25th
Please click on this link to register: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/BiomimicryforIE

 
Please bring your own lunch or be prepared to purchase lunch from area vendors.
Driving, parking and public transportation information can be found here:  http://www.neaq.org/visit_planning/maps_directions_and_parking/index.php
Unfortunately we cannot offer free parking.  Public transportation is recommended.
Workshop will be held in the New England Aquarium’s Ocean Center.
 
Contact Rebekah Stendahl with questions: rstendahl@neaq.org, 617-973-6580

Educator Opportunity to Work with NNOCCI on Climate Change

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A Professional Development Opportunity: Application now open for Study Circles Fall 2014

For educators with an interest in climate change focused on ocean or coastal issues.

 

Visit www.neaq.org/NNOCCI  or www.nnocci.org for more information and to apply.  

Please encourage colleagues to apply and share with your own networks.

 

Contact  jevanswilent@neaq.org for more information

 

 

About the National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation (NNOCCI)

NNOCCI is a collaborative effort led by the New England Aquarium with the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, the FrameWorks Institute, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the National Aquarium in Baltimore, Monterey Bay Aquarium, the New Knowledge Organization in partnership with Pennsylvania State University and the Ohio’s Center for Science and Industry.  With support from the NSF Climate Change Education Partnership program, NNOCCI’s goal is to establish a national network of professionals who are skilled in communicating climate science to the American public.

 

What is a Study Circle?
A NNOCCI Study Circle is a cross-disciplinary learning group made up of peers with expertise from fields of professional interpretation, climate and ocean sciences and communications and cultural sciences. Through a series of facilitated in-person meetings, webinars, conference calls and practical activities, participants build knowledge of ocean and climate science and communications and cultural sciences. They apply lessons learned to communications or educational opportunities in the context of their work environment through several cycles of development, practice, sharing and reflection. Visit www.nnocci.org for more information!

 

New England Aquarium Lecture Series

We’re looking forward to another exciting season of the Aquarium Lecture Series! Forage fish, oysters, cod and New England sharks are only a few of the amazing topics we’ll be covering this season.
Join us in our new home: the Simons IMAX Theatre!

The Aquarium has been providing free lectures and films by scientists, environmental writers, photographers and others since 1972. The Aquarium Lecture Series is presented free to the public through the generosity of the Lowell Institute, which has been providing funding for free public lectures at universities and museums since 1836. Lectures are free and open to the public. Registration is requested. All programs start at 7 p.m. in the Aquarium’s Harborside Learning Lab, unless otherwise noted below. Programs last approximately one hour followed by a reception.

New Season runs April 2nd to June 3rd, 2014.  Lecture schedule here

New England Aquarium Lecture Series

We’re looking forward to another exciting season of the Aquarium Lecture Series! Forage fish, oysters, cod and New England sharks are only a few of the amazing topics we’ll be covering this season.
Join us in our new home: the Simons IMAX Theatre!

The Aquarium has been providing free lectures and films by scientists, environmental writers, photographers and others since 1972. The Aquarium Lecture Series is presented free to the public through the generosity of the Lowell Institute, which has been providing funding for free public lectures at universities and museums since 1836. Lectures are free and open to the public. Registration is requested. All programs start at 7 p.m. in the Aquarium’s Harborside Learning Lab, unless otherwise noted below. Programs last approximately one hour followed by a reception.

New Season runs April 2nd to June 3rd, 2014.  Lecture schedule here

New England Aquarium Introduces Photobooth Activity at Blue Discoveries Family Day

On Earth Day, April 22, visitors at New England Aquarium had a chance to get their pictures made at the I Care Photobooth. In this activity, participants were able to choose one of five chalkboards to fill out and then pose with it. Their statement choices were:

I care by…
One new thing I will do now….
I love…
My favorite…
Today I learned….

You can visit the Aquarium’s website to view pictures from the event. The I Care exercise was part of a Blue Discoveries Family Day. On select Saturdays and Sundays throughout the year, Aquarium educators lead hands-on activities in the main building that encourage visitors to Live Blue. The activities are designed to engage the whole family to learn more about the planet through art, science and storytelling. Plan your next visit to New England Aquarium around one of the Blue Discoveries Family Day. Dates for upcoming events can be found here.

New England Aquarium Introduces Photobooth Activity at Blue Discoveries Family Day

On Earth Day, April 22, visitors at New England Aquarium had a chance to get their pictures made at the I Care Photobooth. In this activity, participants were able to choose one of five chalkboards to fill out and then pose with it. Their statement choices were:

I care by…
One new thing I will do now….
I love…
My favorite…
Today I learned….

You can visit the Aquarium’s website to view pictures from the event. The I Care exercise was part of a Blue Discoveries Family Day. On select Saturdays and Sundays throughout the year, Aquarium educators lead hands-on activities in the main building that encourage visitors to Live Blue. The activities are designed to engage the whole family to learn more about the planet through art, science and storytelling. Plan your next visit to New England Aquarium around one of the Blue Discoveries Family Day. Dates for upcoming events can be found here.